top of page

Career Toolkit

Interviewing Strategies

For instructors and students to use as a learning guide in the classroom.

The Office for Career Success has developed a video module about interviewing strategies. Student, staff, and alumni actors appear in fictional scenarios throughout the video. Instructors have the option of using activity prompts to guide class dialogue and activities.

The learning content in the video module and this toolkit is aligned with NACE Competencies, Gallaudet Student Learning Outcomes, and Gallaudet Undergraduate Career Milestones. Scroll through the page to navigate module videos and activity prompts step by step.

Interviewing Strategies Video

Interviewing Strategies Module Video

Activity Prompts

There are 60 activity prompts in this toolkit. They are intended to be used as a starting point for discussion, assessment, and practice. They can be modified in any number of ways. Different colors signify different prompts. 

Blue activity prompts guide discussion. Students and staff can facilitate interactive dialogue in small or large groups.

Brown activity prompts guide assessment. Students and staff can test their comprehension.

Gold activity prompts guide application. Students and staff can apply their knowledge and skills.

Activity Prompts

DISCUSS

Share an interviewing experience you had in the past.

DISCUSS

Have you ever interviewed somebody else? How might this change in perspective help you improve with your own interview?

DISCUSS

An interview involves evaluation of the information that you share about yourself. Why is this evaluation important? 

DISCUSS

How does preparation make the employer feel that you value their time? 

ASSESS

What elements do you think makes a successful interview?

ASSESS

What is an example of an interview you might experience outside the job-seeking world?

ASSESS

What are different ways you might prepare for an interview with an employer? 

ASSESS

You do not know anything about your potential employer but they are in your dream line of work. Where do you start researching?

DISCUSS

Why does your employer's type (public, private, or non-profit) matter? How might this change the way you prepare for your interview? 

ASSESS

How do you figure out what the gaps of your prospective employer is? How can this help you with your interview? 

APPLY

Ask a classmate to interview you about your decision on how you spent your day so far.

APPLY

An interview involves sharing of information. Try sharing 3 unique nuggets about yourself through ASL and English. 

APPLY

How would you demonstrate being unprepared for a role-play interview with a classmate representing a company like Google?

APPLY

Look up information about where your instructor (or classmate) had their first job. Describe the qualities of that company.  

APPLY

Identify a company that aligns with your goals and values. Name another that doesn't. Show how this would impact your interview experience.

DISCUSS

Why does the employer's track record with interns or employees who identify like you matter?

DISCUSS

Who are some good resources to ask for some interviewing advice?  Who might not be good resources? 

DISCUSS

Can you recall past situations in which you did not feel prepared for? Why are they similar to interviews? 

DISCUSS

Why is it important to show who you are, as well as pride in your cultural background? How can this create a good impression? 

ASSESS

Find an open position on Gallaudet's career portal. Do research on at least two different aspects of this employer.

ASSESS

Megan receives excellent advice about preparing for her job interview. Can you think of any other suggestions?

ASSESS

Give examples of different situations where first impressions made or broke the deal.

ASSESS

Identify three differences between the first student and second student making first impressions. 

DISCUSS

What non-verbal language may go into creating a good or poor first impression?

DISCUSS

What are other strategies you can use if you are not always good at remembering to make eye contact?

DISCUSS

Share examples of past virtual meetings where you have seen others make poor impressions.

DISCUSS

Which elements of creating good first impressions in interviews are most important and are the hardest, and why?

DISCUSS

How does Dr. Brunson's definition of bias help you understand your own biases? 

DISCUSS

If you are a deaf person with intersectional identities, what questions would you not want to be asked? How should you respond if asked?

DISCUSS

Your name is among the best ways to identify yourself. How might masking this on your resume create more harm?

DISCUSS

Dr. Brunson suggests two specific strategies for dealing with unexpected bias during an interview. Discuss.

DISCUSS

Dr. Brunson asserts that it is important to control how you respond if you experienced bias. What are different ways you can control how you respond?

DISCUSS

What are different ways to follow up after an interview?

DISCUSS

Beth shares several examples of some resources. Can you brainstorm more resources on and off campus?

ASSESS

Look up unfamiliar names (of various places) and practice repeating them during conversation.

ASSESS

Check your computer. Is it fully updated to the latest versions of all different possible videoconferencing platforms?

ASSESS

You see several different bad examples of virtual backgrounds. Can you share additional examples?

ASSESS

Can you identify different kinds of biases that may emerge during an interview?

ASSESS

Which groups fall into the category of being impacted by bias?

ASSESS

How might gamification cause harm to a student who has disabilities? 

ASSESS

How might each section on your resume lead to interview bias? Give examples of each.

ASSESS

Why is it good to ask questions and better understand where the interviewer is coming from? How does this help your candidacy?

ASSESS

Where can you look up information and resources to learn more about bias and microaggression?

ASSESS

If you missed important points you wanted to sell about yourself during the interview, how can you capture these in a thank you note?

ASSESS

Which faculty would you ask about their experiences regarding interviewing strategies?

APPLY

Using that open position, develop five interview questions you would probably want to ask if you were the hiring manager. 

APPLY

In the example, the student did not prepare well for their interview. Model their same answers, but in a way that shows preparation on your part.

APPLY

Think of how the employer also has to make a good first impression on you as the candidate! Share examples.

APPLY

Practice specific strategies (handshake, repeating names) with your classmates in a group setting. 

APPLY

Reenact the eye contact scenarios with your classmate(s); how does this affect their experience?

APPLY

Turn on your videoconferencing platform (such as Zoom). Experiment with different backgrounds and lighting.

APPLY

Consider all the different pieces of clothes you have in your wardrobe. Which ones would you wear or not wear to an interview?

APPLY

What are some questions you are curious and wish to know about biases during interviews?

APPLY

Identify examples of power imbalances you may face, including those that benefit you and put you at a disadvantage.

APPLY

Dr. Brunson discusses how language can play a factor in resume screening. List some examples of how this can happen in your area of study. 

APPLY

What are some privileges you have that may lead to making assumptions if you interview somebody?

APPLY

Micah shares during their conversation with Dr. Brunson that they grew up experiencing bias but did not realize it until later. Do you have similar stories?

APPLY

Dr. Brunson thinks it's important to define yourself as a person before you let others define you. What are ways you can do this during an interview?

APPLY

What are certain strategies or skills you think you would like to practice more during a mock interview? How can you find support with those?

APPLY

Contact your Career Educator for more ideas and to request a mock interview!

IS SLO

How does this toolkit address these Student Learning Outcomes?

Student Learning Outcomes

Gallaudet Scholar Student Learning Outcomes: Bilingual, career ready, critical thinkers, digitally aware, ethical, global citizens, science literate, and wellness grounded

BILINGUAL

Use American Sign Language (ASL) and written English to communicate effectively with diverse audiences for a variety of purposes.

CAREER READY

Engage in theoretical and experiential learning to develop career decision-making skills and competencies.

CRITICAL THINKERS

Think critically and innovatively, and express creatively, making connections within and across disciplines.

DIGITALLY AWARE

Employ data and technology in effective, competent, fair, accountable, transparent, and responsible (ethical) ways.

ETHICAL

Formulate reasoned decisions about ethical issues that lead to wise action.

GLOBAL CITIZENS

Articulate knowledge of intersectional identities within a global society and demonstrate intercultural knowledge, cultural competence, and skills in constructive civic discourse on the local, national, and global levels.

SCIENCE LITERATE

Evaluate evidence derived from a systematic analysis of quantitative and qualitative data to address issues that pertain to the experiences of individuals in societies.

WELLNESS GROUNDED

Recognize how choices can transform health, well-being, and ability to thrive; seek support and utilize resources for personal growth; and work collaboratively to promote wellness on campus and within oneself.

IS CareerMilestones

CAREER ARTICULATIONS

Gallaudet students will articulate their skills, experiences, and achievements.

CAREER COMPETENCIES

Gallaudet students will develop success competencies related to their future aspirations.

CAREER CONNECTIONS

Gallaudet students will have the chance to interact meaningfully with employers and alumni.

CAREER EXPERIENCES

Gallaudet students will gain experiential learning experiences tied to their career goals.

CAREER REFLECTIONS

Gallaudet students will plan and reflect on their career journey across their academic curriculum.

How does this toolkit address these career milestones?

Career Milestones

Gallaudet Career Milestones: Career articulations, competencies, connections, experiences, and reflections
bottom of page